TORAH TIDBIT

Torah Tidbits - Study Judaism with Rabbi Rapport and Rabbi David.
Torah Tidbits - Study Judaism with Rabbi Rapport and Rabbi David. Ki Tisa Tetzaveh Pekudei Vayikra (Leviticus 1:1−5:26)The opening word of Leviticus that gives the book and this first parashah its name is Vayikra Tazria Metzorah Achrei Mot Emor B’har B’hukotai Sh’lach L’cha Korach Matot Masei D'varim Va-et’chanan Eikev Nitzavim Chayei Sarah Tol'dot

B’reishit (Genesis 1:1-6:8)

This Week’s Torah Portion: B’reishit (Genesis 1:1-6:8)

The Big Bet which Begins each Torah scroll with the word B’reishit is clearly not an accident. God really seemed to want to make a point of beginning the Torah with the letter Bet. This assumes, of course, that God wrote that first letter, with a quill pen and a deep brown ink upon a parchment scroll, just as scribes have done in writing that first word of Torah again and again for thousands of years.

There is a mystical midrash, a legend of our people, which teaches us that God considered beginning the Torah with the first letter of the Hebrew alphabet which is Alef. God decided against the Alef because Alef is the beginning of the word Aror, which means “curse”, whereas Bet is the beginning of the word B’rachah, which means, blessing.

May each of us write our works upon this earth for blessing and not for curse, and may we together become repairers of the breach – builders of a better world.

B’reishit Summary:
God creates the world and everything in it in six days and rests on the seventh. (1:1-2:3)
Adam and Eve are placed in the Garden of Eden, where they eat the forbidden fruit and are subsequently exiled. (2:15-3:24)
Adam and Eve have two sons, Cain and Abel. Cain kills his brother, Abel. (4:1-24)
Adam and Eve have another child named Seth. The Torah lists the ten generations from Adam to Noah. (4:25-5:32)
God regrets having created human beings and decides to destroy everything on earth, but Noah finds favor with God. (6:5-6:8)
Torah Tidbits - Study Judaism with Rabbi Rapport and Rabbi David. Ki Tisa Tetzaveh Pekudei Vayikra (Leviticus 1:1−5:26)The opening word of Leviticus that gives the book and this first parashah its name is Vayikra Tazria Metzorah Achrei Mot Emor B’har B’hukotai Sh’lach L’cha Korach Matot Masei D'varim Va-et’chanan Eikev Nitzavim Chayei Sarah Tol'dot

Sukkot (Holidays Exodus 33:12–34:26)

This Week’s Torah Portion: Shabbat Chol HaMo-eid Sukkot (Holidays Exodus 33:12–34:26)

Why do we build a Sukkah? That is a great question, we argued about the right answer for about 200 years and did not come to a conclusion.

One answer is that the Sukkah represents the memory of the Divine presence leading our ancestors when they wandered in the desert for 40 years. “God went before them in a pillar of cloud by day, to guide them along the way,” (Exodus 13:21). When we enter the Sukkah we feel for a moment the presence of the Divine guiding us on our life journeys as we wander through our desert. May you have a Joyous Sukkot, please come and visit the temple Sukkah.

Sukkot Summary:
On the Shabbat during Sukkot, we are reminded of the age-old desire to know God. Moses implores God to let him see God. While God will not allow Moses to see God’s face, God tells Moses, “I will make My goodness pass before you…” Perhaps we experience the divine presence through the goodness we create in the world. The Torah then sets forth the thirteen attributes of God, among them that God is compassionate, gracious, slow to anger and abounding in kindness. By emulating these very attributes, we create the goodness which allows us to know God.
Torah Tidbits - Study Judaism with Rabbi Rapport and Rabbi David. Ki Tisa Tetzaveh Pekudei Vayikra (Leviticus 1:1−5:26)The opening word of Leviticus that gives the book and this first parashah its name is Vayikra Tazria Metzorah Achrei Mot Emor B’har B’hukotai Sh’lach L’cha Korach Matot Masei D'varim Va-et’chanan Eikev Nitzavim Chayei Sarah Tol'dot

Haazinu (Deuteronomy 32:1–52)

This Week’s Torah Portion: Haazinu (Deuteronomy 32:1–52)

In Haazinu (Listen), Moses explains how the history of the relationship between Adonai our God and Israel began. It is a different version/source, and a different story than the ones we read before. In this version, God did not choose us; God won us in a lottery. We are not the chosen people of God, but the people that won Adonai our God in a lottery. There are many nations in the world according to this version, and each has their own God, our lot is Adonai, and their lot is different.

This Week’s Torah Portion: Haazinu (Deuteronomy 32:1–52)

In Haazinu (Listen), Moses explains how the history of the relationship between Adonai our God and Israel began. It is a different version/source, and a different story than the ones we read before. In this version, God did not choose us; God won us in a lottery. We are not the chosen people of God, but the people that won Adonai our God in a lottery. There are many nations in the world according to this version, and each has their own God, our lot is Adonai, and their lot is different.

Haazinu Summary:
Moses sings his last song, a love poem to God and a chastisement of the people, who are not worthy of Adonai. (32:1–6)
The poem recounts the blessings that God has bestowed on the Israelites, the wicked deeds they have committed, and the punishments that God then inflicted upon them. (32:7–43)
God tells Moses to begin his ascent of Mount Nebo, from where he will see the Land of Israel from a distance but will not be allowed to enter it. (32:45–52)

Torah Tidbits - Study Judaism with Rabbi Rapport and Rabbi David. Ki Tisa Tetzaveh Pekudei Vayikra (Leviticus 1:1−5:26)The opening word of Leviticus that gives the book and this first parashah its name is Vayikra Tazria Metzorah Achrei Mot Emor B’har B’hukotai Sh’lach L’cha Korach Matot Masei D'varim Va-et’chanan Eikev Nitzavim Chayei Sarah Tol'dot

Vayeilech (Deuteronomy 31:1–30)

This Week’s Torah Portion: Vayeilech (Deuteronomy 31:1–30)

Moses the greatest leader, prophet, law giver we ever had dies. He dies without reaching the Promised Land. Moses’ death teaches us a great lesson, we do not get to fulfil everything we wish and aim for. Even Moses the greatest of all dies without getting to his promised land. A Life worth living, a great legacy is when you still have goals you want to achieve, when you still yearn for more.

This Week’s Torah Portion: Vayeilech (Deuteronomy 31:1–30)

Moses the greatest leader, prophet, law giver we ever had dies. He dies without reaching the Promised Land. Moses’ death teaches us a great lesson, we do not get to fulfil everything we wish and aim for. Even Moses the greatest of all dies without getting to his promised land. A Life worth living, a great legacy is when you still have goals you want to achieve, when you still yearn for more.

Vayeilech Summary:
Moses prepares the people for his death and announces that Joshua will succeed him. (31:1–8)
Moses instructs the priests and the elders regarding the importance of reading the Torah. (31:9–13)
God informs Moses that upon his death, the people will commit idolatry and “many evils and troubles shall befall them.” God tells Moses to teach the people a poem that will “be My witness.” (31:14–30)

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