TORAH TIDBIT

Torah Tidbits - Study Judaism with Rabbi Rapport and Rabbi David.
Torah Tidbits - Study Judaism with Rabbi Rapport and Rabbi David. Ki Tisa Tetzaveh Pekudei Vayikra (Leviticus 1:1−5:26)The opening word of Leviticus that gives the book and this first parashah its name is Vayikra Tazria Metzorah Achrei Mot Emor B’har B’hukotai Sh’lach L’cha Korach Matot Masei D'varim Va-et’chanan Eikev Nitzavim Chayei Sarah Tol'dot

Toldot (Genesis 23:1−25:18)

This Week’s Torah Portion: Toldot – תּוֹלְדֹת (Genesis 25:19−28:9)

Jacob’s journey to adulthood is a long and arduous tale and it does not begin well. Jacob, whose name means “heel,” begins his life as the ultimate trickster. He is born grasping onto his brother’s heel and so he lives out his young life – grasping always to trip up his brother, grasping to gain what is not rightfully his own.

But, eventual he sheds the name “heel” and Jacob begins to “heal.” Jacob finds love and begins a family. He learns to use his wits to find his own way in the world. Jacob journeys home hoping to heal that rift he has created. He has been blessed with more than enough wealth in flocks and herds to have and to share with his brother. He has learned that family matters more than anything any of us might have or own. Jacob wrestles with an angel and receives a new name, Israel.  Israel is our people’s name. Israel represents us all.

Jacob’s journey to becoming Israel is a lesson for us all: a lesson on our ability to learn and to grow, a lesson on what really matters in life, a lesson on what to be thankful for. 

Parsha Toldot Torah Summary:

Rebekah has twins, Esau and Jacob. (25:19-26) Esau gives Jacob his birthright in exchange for some stew. (25:27-34) King Abimelech is led to think that Rebekah is Isaac’s sister and later finds out that she is really his wife. (26:1-16) Isaac plans to bless Esau, his firstborn. Rebekah and Jacob deceive Isaac so that Jacob receives the blessing. (27:1-29) Esau threatens to kill Jacob, who then flees to Haran. (27:30-45)
Torah Tidbits - Study Judaism with Rabbi Rapport and Rabbi David. Ki Tisa Tetzaveh Pekudei Vayikra (Leviticus 1:1−5:26)The opening word of Leviticus that gives the book and this first parashah its name is Vayikra Tazria Metzorah Achrei Mot Emor B’har B’hukotai Sh’lach L’cha Korach Matot Masei D'varim Va-et’chanan Eikev Nitzavim Chayei Sarah Tol'dot

Chayei Sarah (Genesis 23:1−25:18)

This Week’s Torah Portion: Chayei Sarah – חַיֵּי שָׂרָה (Genesis 23:1−25:18)

Abraham had three sons, not two.

Abraham had three sons, Ishmael (literally God will hear), Yitzhak (literally he will laugh) and Yivke (literally he will cry).  

Nobody ever heard about Yivke, because he was the small one

The beloved son who was sacrificed on Mount Moriah.

Ishmael was saved by his mother Hagar, Yitzhak was rescued by the angel,

But nobody saved Yivke. When he was small

His father lovingly named him Yivke, Yivk, my lovely little Yevk.

But he sacrificed him at the Akeda.

The Torah says it was a ram, but it was Yivke.

Yishmael never again heard God.

Yitzhak never laughed again

And Sarah only laughed once, never again.

Abraham had three sons,

Yishma, Yitzhak, Yivke,

Ishmael, Yitzhak-el, Yivke-El.  

Taken from “Open Shut Open” by Yehuda Amichai:

Parsha Chayei Sarah Torah Summary:

Abraham purchases the cave of Machpelah in order to bury his wife Sarah. (23:1-20) Abraham sends his servant to find a bride for Isaac. (24:1-9) Rebekah shows her kindness by offering to draw water for the servant’s camels at the well. (24:15-20) The servant meets Rebekah’s family and then takes Rebekah to Isaac, who marries her. (24:23-67) Abraham takes another wife, named Keturah. At the age of one hundred and seventy-five years, Abraham dies, and Isaac and Ishmael bury him in the cave of Machpelah. (25:1-11) Abraham had three sons, not two. Abraham had three sons, Ishmael (literally God will hear), Yitzhak (literally he will laugh) and Yivke (literally he will cry). Nobody ever heard about Yivke, because he was the small one The beloved son who was sacrificed on Mount Moriah. Ishmael was saved by his mother Hagar, Yitzhak was rescued by the angel, But nobody saved Yivke. When he was small His father lovingly named him Yivke, Yivk, my lovely little Yevk. But he sacrificed him at the Akeda. The Torah says it was a ram, but it was Yivke. Yishmael never again heard God. Yitzhak never laughed again And Sarah only laughed once, never again. Abraham had three sons, Yishma, Yitzhak, Yivke, Ishmael, Yitzhak-el, Yivke-El. Taken from “Open Shut Open” by Yehuda Amichai:
Torah Tidbits - Study Judaism with Rabbi Rapport and Rabbi David. Ki Tisa Tetzaveh Pekudei Vayikra (Leviticus 1:1−5:26)The opening word of Leviticus that gives the book and this first parashah its name is Vayikra Tazria Metzorah Achrei Mot Emor B’har B’hukotai Sh’lach L’cha Korach Matot Masei D'varim Va-et’chanan Eikev Nitzavim Chayei Sarah Tol'dot

Vayeira (Genesis 18:1–22:24)

This Week’s Torah Portion: Vayeira – וַיֵּרָא (Genesis 18:1–22:24)

Lovingkindness, compassion, and empathy are the highest values of Jewish living, way before religious observance and ritual and worship as we learn  – “The reward one receives for accompanying guests is greater than all of the others. This is a statute which Abraham our Patriarch instituted and the path of kindness which he would follow. He would feed wayfarers, provide them with drink, and accompany them. Showing hospitality for guests surpasses receiving the Divine Presence.” Maimonides Mishne Torah, Laws of mourning, 14:2

Parsha Vayeira Torah Summary:

Abraham welcomes three visitors, who announce that Sarah will soon have a son. (18:1-15) Abraham argues with God about the destruction of Sodom and Gomorrah. (18:16-33) Lot’s home is attacked by the people of Sodom. Lot and his two daughters escape as the cities are being destroyed. Lot’s wife is turned into a pillar of salt. (19:1-29) Lot impregnates his daughters, and they bear children who become the founders of the nations Moab and Ammon. (19:30-38) Abimelech, king of Gerar, takes Sarah as his wife after Abraham claims that she is his sister. (20:1-18) Isaac is born, circumcised, and weaned. Hagar and her son, Ishmael, are sent away; an angel saves their lives. (21:1-21) God tests Abraham, instructing him to sacrifice Isaac on Mount Moriah. (22:1-19) Lovingkindness, compassion and empathy are the highest values of Jewish living, way before religious observance and ritual and worship as we learn – “The reward one receives for accompanying guests is greater than all of the others. This is a statute which Abraham our Patriarch instituted and the path of kindness which he would follow. He would feed wayfarers, provide them with drink, and accompany them. Showing hospitality for guests surpasses receiving the Divine Presence.” Maimonides Mishne Torah, Laws of mourning, 14:2
Torah Tidbits - Study Judaism with Rabbi Rapport and Rabbi David. Ki Tisa Tetzaveh Pekudei Vayikra (Leviticus 1:1−5:26)The opening word of Leviticus that gives the book and this first parashah its name is Vayikra Tazria Metzorah Achrei Mot Emor B’har B’hukotai Sh’lach L’cha Korach Matot Masei D'varim Va-et’chanan Eikev Nitzavim Chayei Sarah Tol'dot

Lech L’cha (Genesis 12:1−17:27)

This Week’s Torah Portion: Lech L’cha – לָךְ-לְךָ (Genesis 12:1−17:27)

“Adonai had said to Abram, ‘Go from … to the land I will show you. I will make you into a great nation’”; Adonai’s first calling to our first Ancestor is to become a great Nation!

Since the time of Abraham, the Jew has always related personhood to peoplehood. We are part of a people; for Jews, participation in sacred community is the path to ultimate meaning.

Parsha Lech L’cha Torah Summary:

Abram, Sarai, and Lot go to Canaan. (12:1-9) Famine takes them to Egypt, where Abram identifies Sarai as his sister in order to save his life. (12:10-20) Abram and Lot separate. Lot is taken captive, and Abram rescues him. (13:1-14:24) Abram has a son, Ishmael, with his Egyptian maidservant, Hagar. (16:1-16) God establishes a covenant with Abram. The sign of this covenant is circumcision on the eighth day following a male baby’s birth. (17:1-27) “Adonai had said to Abram, ‘Go from … to the land I will show you. I will make you into a great nation’”; Adonai’s first calling to our first Ancestor is to become a great Nation! Since the time of Abraham, the Jew has always related personhood to peoplehood. We are part of a people; for Jews, participation in sacred community is the path to ultimate meaning. Abram, Sarai, and Lot go to Canaan. (12:1-9) Famine takes them to Egypt, where Abram identifies Sarai as his sister in order to save his life. (12:10-20) Abram and Lot separate. Lot is taken captive, and Abram rescues him. (13:1-14:24) Abram has a son, Ishmael, with his Egyptian maidservant, Hagar. (16:1-16) God establishes a covenant with Abram. The sign of this covenant is circumcision on the eighth day following a male baby’s birth. (17:1-27) “Adonai had said to Abram, ‘Go from … to the land I will show you. I will make you into a great nation’”; Adonai’s first calling to our first Ancestor is to become a great Nation! Since the time of Abraham, the Jew has always related personhood to peoplehood. We are part of a people; for Jews, participation in sacred community is the path to ultimate meaning.

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