TORAH TIDBIT

Torah Tidbits - Study Judaism with Rabbi Rapport and Rabbi David.
Torah Tidbits - Study Judaism with Rabbi Rapport and Rabbi David. Ki Tisa Tetzaveh Pekudei Vayikra (Leviticus 1:1−5:26)The opening word of Leviticus that gives the book and this first parashah its name is Vayikra Tazria Metzorah Achrei Mot Emor B’har B’hukotai Sh’lach L’cha Korach Matot Masei D'varim Va-et’chanan Eikev Nitzavim Chayei Sarah Tol'dot

Vayeitzei (Genesis 28:10−32:3)

This Week’s Torah Portion: Vayeitzei (Genesis 28:10−32:3)

“Surely Adonai is in this place, and I did not know it” (Genesis 28:16)
True knowledge can be acquired only when we realize that we do not know. True encounter with the Divine can happen when we realize we do not know.

Vayeitzei Summary:

Jacob dreams of angels going up and down a ladder. God blesses him. Jacob names the place Bethel. (28:10-22)
Jacob works seven years in order to marry Rachel, but Laban tricks Jacob into marrying Leah, Rachel’s older sister. (29:16-25)
Jacob marries Rachel but only after having to commit himself to seven more years of working for Laban. (29:26-30)
Leah, Rachel, and their maidservants, Bilhah and Zilpah, give birth to eleven sons and one daughter. (29:31-30:24)
Jacob and his family leave Laban’s household with great wealth. (31:1-32:3)

“Surely Adonai is in this place, and I did not know it” (Genesis 28:16)
True knowledge can be acquired only when we realize that we do not know. True encounter with the Divine can happen when we realize we do not know.

Jacob dreams of angels going up and down a ladder. God blesses him. Jacob names the place Bethel. (28:10-22)
Jacob works seven years in order to marry Rachel, but Laban tricks Jacob into marrying Leah, Rachel’s older sister. (29:16-25)
Jacob marries Rachel but only after having to commit himself to seven more years of working for Laban. (29:26-30)
Leah, Rachel, and their maidservants, Bilhah and Zilpah, give birth to eleven sons and one daughter. (29:31-30:24)
Jacob and his family leave Laban’s household with great wealth. (31:1-32:3)

Torah Tidbits - Study Judaism with Rabbi Rapport and Rabbi David. Ki Tisa Tetzaveh Pekudei Vayikra (Leviticus 1:1−5:26)The opening word of Leviticus that gives the book and this first parashah its name is Vayikra Tazria Metzorah Achrei Mot Emor B’har B’hukotai Sh’lach L’cha Korach Matot Masei D'varim Va-et’chanan Eikev Nitzavim Chayei Sarah Tol'dot

Tol’dot (Genesis 25:19−28:9)

This Week’s Torah Portion: Tol’dot (Genesis 25:19−28:9)

“The babies jostled each other within Rebecca, and she said, “Why is this happening to me?” So she went to inquire of Adonai.” (Genesis 25:22)
Rebecca is the first person in the world that “inquires” of Adonai.
The Hebrew verb used here is לדרוש meaning “to demand” to inquire” to make a Drashah (commentary or story)”. Rebecca is the founder of a long Jewish tradition. We do not accept the world as it is, we demand explanations, we demand a better world for ourselves and for all humanity.

Tol’dot Sarah Summary:

Rebekah has twins, Esau and Jacob. (25:19-26)
Esau gives Jacob his birthright in exchange for some stew. (25:27-34)
King Abimelech is led to think that Rebekah is Isaac’s sister and later finds out that she is really his wife. (26:1-16)
Isaac plans to bless Esau, his firstborn. Rebekah and Jacob deceive Isaac so that Jacob receives the blessing. (27:1-29)
Esau threatens to kill Jacob, who then flees to Haran. (27:30-45)
“The babies jostled each other within Rebecca, and she said, “Why is this happening to me?” So she went to inquire of Adonai.” (Genesis 25:22)
Rebecca is the first person in the world that “inquires” of Adonai.
The Hebrew verb used here is לדרוש meaning “to demand” to inquire” to make a Drashah (commentary or story)”. Rebecca is the founder of a long Jewish tradition. We do not accept the world as it is, we demand explanations, we demand a better world for ourselves and for all humanity.

Torah Tidbits - Study Judaism with Rabbi Rapport and Rabbi David. Ki Tisa Tetzaveh Pekudei Vayikra (Leviticus 1:1−5:26)The opening word of Leviticus that gives the book and this first parashah its name is Vayikra Tazria Metzorah Achrei Mot Emor B’har B’hukotai Sh’lach L’cha Korach Matot Masei D'varim Va-et’chanan Eikev Nitzavim Chayei Sarah Tol'dot

Chayei Sarah (Genesis 23:1−25:18)

This Week’s Torah Portion: Chayei Sarah (Genesis 23:1−25:18)

“Abraham spoke to the Hittites. He said, “I am a foreigner and stranger among you. …The Hittites replied to Abraham, “Sir, listen to us. You are a mighty prince among us.” (Genesis 23:4-5)

Our history begins with Abraham, who was a stranger and a foreigner, and was treaded by the citizens of the land as a mighty prince, with kindness and respect. We should become at list as kind and nice to the strangers and foreigners in our land and treat them with kindness and respect.

Chayei Sarah Summary:

Abraham purchases the cave of Machpelah in order to bury his wife Sarah. (23:1-20)
Abraham sends his servant to find a bride for Isaac. (24:1-9)
Rebekah shows her kindness by offering to draw water for the servant’s camels at the well. (24:15-20)
The servant meets Rebekah’s family and then takes Rebekah to Isaac, who marries her. (24:23-67)
Abraham takes another wife, named Keturah. At the age of one hundred and seventy-five years, Abraham dies, and Isaac and Ishmael bury him in the cave of Machpelah. (25:1-11)
“Abraham spoke to the Hittites. He said, “I am a foreigner and stranger among you. …The Hittites replied to Abraham, “Sir, listen to us. You are a mighty prince among us.” (Genesis 23:4-5)

Our history begins with Abraham, who was a stranger and a foreigner, and was treaded by the citizens of the land as a mighty prince, with kindness and respect. We should become at list as kind and nice to the strangers and foreigners in our land and treat them with kindness and respect.

Chayei Sarah Summary:

Abraham purchases the cave of Machpelah in order to bury his wife Sarah. (23:1-20)
Abraham sends his servant to find a bride for Isaac. (24:1-9)
Rebekah shows her kindness by offering to draw water for the servant’s camels at the well. (24:15-20)
The servant meets Rebekah’s family and then takes Rebekah to Isaac, who marries her. (24:23-67)
Abraham takes another wife, named Keturah. At the age of one hundred and seventy-five years, Abraham dies, and Isaac and Ishmael bury him in the cave of Machpelah. (25:1-11)

Torah Tidbits - Study Judaism with Rabbi Rapport and Rabbi David. Ki Tisa Tetzaveh Pekudei Vayikra (Leviticus 1:1−5:26)The opening word of Leviticus that gives the book and this first parashah its name is Vayikra Tazria Metzorah Achrei Mot Emor B’har B’hukotai Sh’lach L’cha Korach Matot Masei D'varim Va-et’chanan Eikev Nitzavim Chayei Sarah Tol'dot

Vayeira (Genesis 18:1–22:24)

This Week’s Torah Portion: Vayeira (Genesis 18:1–22:24)

Tales of Destruction abound in the literature of the ancient world. Flood stories, fire stories, stories of war and plague and destruction. And, in many ways, the story of Sodom and Gomorrah is just a Jewish version of that same sort of terrifying tale. And yet, the biblical story of Sodom and Gomorrah takes these tales and turns them on their heads to ask some deeper questions about the nature of God, the meaning of justice, and the role which we, God’s children, are commanded to play.

The story of Sodom and Gomorrah is not about the destruction of two cities, lost to the sand and salt of time. The moral of this story is a more lifted legend. The lesson of Sodom and Gomorrah is simply this: God is not in the whirlwind, not in the destructive hand. God is in the still small voice which murmurs beneath the blessing, beneath the pain, beneath the lives we all lead upon this earth. God is in Abraham’s willingness to provoke God, and God is in God’s listening to Abraham’s call. The moral of our story is: never be afraid to provoke, even God, for the cause of justice.

Vayeira Summary:

First, Abraham welcomes three visitors. They announce that Sarah will soon have a son. (18:1-15)
Then, Abraham argues with God about the destruction of Sodom and Gomorrah. (18:16-33)
Moreover, Lot’s home is attacked by the people of Sodom. So Lot and his two daughters escape as the cities are being destroyed. And then, Lot’s wife is turned into a pillar of salt. (19:1-29)
After that, Lot impregnates his daughters, and they bear children who become the founders of the nations Moab and Ammon. (19:30-38)
Abimelech, king of Gerar, takes Sarah as his wife after Abraham claims that she is his sister. (20:1-18)
Yet, Isaac is born, circumcised, and weaned. Hagar and her son, Ishmael, are sent away; an angel saves their lives. (21:1-21)
In conclusion, God tests Abraham. Most importantly, God instructs him to sacrifice Isaac on Mount Moriah. (22:1-19)

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