TORAH TIDBIT

Torah Tidbits - Study Judaism with Rabbi Rapport and Rabbi David.
Torah Tidbits - Study Judaism with Rabbi Rapport and Rabbi David. Ki Tisa Tetzaveh Pekudei Vayikra (Leviticus 1:1−5:26)The opening word of Leviticus that gives the book and this first parashah its name is Vayikra Tazria Metzorah Achrei Mot Emor B’har B’hukotai Sh’lach L’cha Korach Matot Masei D'varim Va-et’chanan Eikev Nitzavim Chayei Sarah Tol'dot Mishpatim

Emor – אֱמֹר (Leviticus 21:1−24:23)

This Week’s Torah Portion: Emor – אֱמֹר (Leviticus 21:1−24:23)

Emor is about the laws of the priests. The priests who serve Adonai, our God, can not become impure by having contact with death, and they are not allowed to drink wine or Alcohol while serving God.

Judaism is about life and the sacredness of life, here and now. Our tradition teaches us that connecting with God and spiritual life should be achieved in the real world, not by avoiding life but in reality and daily life.

Parsha Emor – אֱמֹר Torah Summary:

Laws regulating the lives and sacrifices of the priests are presented. (21:1-22:33) The set times of the Jewish calendar are named and described: the Sabbath, Rosh Hashanah, Yom Kippur, and the Pilgrimage Festivals of Pesach, Shavuot, and Sukkot. (23:1-44) God commands the Israelites to bring clear olive oil for lighting the sanctuary menorah. The ingredients and placement of the displayed loaves of sanctuary bread are explained. (24:1-9) Laws dealing with profanity, murder, and the maiming of others are outlined. (24:10-23) Emor – אֱמֹר Emor is about the laws of the priests. The priests who serve Adonai, our God, can not become impure by having contact with death, and they are not allowed to drink wine or Alcohol while serving God. Judaism is about life and the sacredness of life, here and now. Our tradition teaches us that connecting with God and spiritual life should be achieved in the real world, not by avoiding life but in reality and daily life.
Torah Tidbits - Study Judaism with Rabbi Rapport and Rabbi David. Ki Tisa Tetzaveh Pekudei Vayikra (Leviticus 1:1−5:26)The opening word of Leviticus that gives the book and this first parashah its name is Vayikra Tazria Metzorah Achrei Mot Emor B’har B’hukotai Sh’lach L’cha Korach Matot Masei D'varim Va-et’chanan Eikev Nitzavim Chayei Sarah Tol'dot Mishpatim

K’doshim – קְדֹשִׁים (Leviticus 19:1-20:27)

This Week’s Torah Portion: K’doshim – קְדֹשִׁים (Leviticus 19:1-20:27)

“Love your fellow as yourself: I am Adonai” Leviticus 19:18

“The strangers who reside with you shall be to you as your citizens; you shall love each one as yourself, for you were strangers in the land of Egypt: I יהוה am your God” Leviticus 19:34.

The Holiness Code in the Torah commands us to try to live a holy life, walk in God’s ways, and love all fellow human beings as we love ourselves. I hope and pray to be able to exercise this commandment in my life. Shabbat Shalom!

K’doshim – קְדֹשִׁים Torah Summary:

God issues a variety of commandments, instructing the Israelites on how to be a holy people. (19:1-37) Various sex offenses are discussed and punishments for them are presented. (20:1-27) K’doshim – קְדֹשִׁים “Love your fellow as yourself: I am Adonai” Leviticus 19:18 “The strangers who reside with you shall be to you as your citizens; you shall love each one as yourself, for you were strangers in the land of Egypt: I יהוה am your God” Leviticus 19:34. The Holiness Code in the Torah commands us to try to live a holy life, walk in God’s ways, and love all fellow human beings as we love ourselves. I hope and pray to be able to exercise this commandment in my life. Shabbat Shalom!
Torah Tidbits - Study Judaism with Rabbi Rapport and Rabbi David. Ki Tisa Tetzaveh Pekudei Vayikra (Leviticus 1:1−5:26)The opening word of Leviticus that gives the book and this first parashah its name is Vayikra Tazria Metzorah Achrei Mot Emor B’har B’hukotai Sh’lach L’cha Korach Matot Masei D'varim Va-et’chanan Eikev Nitzavim Chayei Sarah Tol'dot Mishpatim

Acharei Mot II – אַחֲרֵי מוֹת (Leviticus 16:1–18:30)

This Week’s Torah Portion: Acharei Mot II – אַחֲרֵי מוֹת (Leviticus 16:1–18:30)

This week, on the Reform calendar of Torah Readings, we revisit ParashatAcharei Mot where we read:

And it shall be a law for you forever: in the seventh month, on the tenth day of the month, you shall afflict your souls, and shall do no manner of work, the citizen, and the stranger that lives among you. For on this day Atonement shall be made for you, to cleanse you from all your sins… (Leviticus 16:29-30)

Wait a minute, Yom Kippur? We are just days past our Passover Seders. Why are we talking about Yom Kippur? But if you think about it, there is a tie that binds these two greatest holiday of the Jewish year – and that is Hunger. 

On Yom Kippur we fast all day to remind ourselves of our pressing duty to redeem the world.We read from the great Haftarah of Isaiah: 

Is it such a fast I asked for? A day to afflict your soul? To bow your head like a bulrush, to wear sackcloth and ashes? Do you call this a fast, a day acceptable unto God? … Rather, you shall give bread to the hungry and bring the poor into your house. (Isaiah 58:5-7)

This is why, on Yom Kippur, we collect food for the Hungry, so that those who fast every day simply because they haven’t enough food to eat might find sustenance.

On Passover, for one week, we eat Matzah – the poor bread, the bread of affliction, to remind ourselves that we are the descendants of slaves, that we were strangers in the land of Egypt, and so we say:“Let all who are hungry come and eat,” and we open our doors for Elijah, and we make contributions to Hunger organizations, so that through our remembrance we might become builders of a better world.

Parashat Acharei Mot is all about the Yom Kippur fast. Now, isn’t that the perfect Torah Portion to follow after Passover this year. Make a contribution to feed the hungry, so by our hands and our hearts we may be builders of a better world.

Parsha Acharei Mot II – אַחֲרֵי מוֹת Torah Summary:

Moses condemns the sexual practices of some neighboring peoples. Certain forms of sexual relations are prohibited. (18:1-30) Acharei Mot II – אַחֲרֵי מוֹת
Torah Tidbits - Study Judaism with Rabbi Rapport and Rabbi David. Ki Tisa Tetzaveh Pekudei Vayikra (Leviticus 1:1−5:26)The opening word of Leviticus that gives the book and this first parashah its name is Vayikra Tazria Metzorah Achrei Mot Emor B’har B’hukotai Sh’lach L’cha Korach Matot Masei D'varim Va-et’chanan Eikev Nitzavim Chayei Sarah Tol'dot Mishpatim

Acharei Mot – אַחֲרֵי מוֹת (Leviticus 16:1–17:16)

This Week’s Torah Portion: Acharei Mot – אַחֲרֵי מוֹת (Leviticus 16:1–17:16)

Acharei Mot, appears at the exact midpoint of the Torah. Beyond that distinction, there is little here of obvious merit. The topics for discussion are blood rituals, forbidden sexual relations, and the minute details of the sacrificial cult. In a broader sense though, Acharei Mot does stand at the center of the Torah, at the dividing line of Leviticus, marking the last of the ritual sections which have occupied us until now, followed by the Holiness Code and the laws which teach us of our obligations to one another in our everyday life.

Stepping back, there is a unity to what Leviticus comes to teach. At first, it seems rather odd that in this first half of the book, concerned largely with the rituals of sacrifice, God is barely mentioned. And then, as the topics turn toward the laws which affect our relations with other human beings, God’s name is emphasized again and again! And yet, this is precisely the point Leviticus intends to make. 

The first half of Leviticus could easily lead to a mistaken understanding that God’s Presence is limited to the Tabernacle alone. And, that once we leave God’s holy place we can leave God there. The second half of Leviticus is intended to counter just this misconception. The Tabernacle does not limit God to that Holy Place, rather, it channels God’s presence from heaven to earth in order that it can reach forth from the Temple, outward to the entire world. The second half of Leviticus contains commandments which transport God’s Presence from inside God’s Holy Place, directly into our daily lives.

It is a simple but important message. God does not live only in holy sanctuaries, nor should our Judaism. If we would seek God in our lives, then we must carry within us the message of God’s words, everywhere we go and in everything we do. Acharei Mot teaches us that true holiness lives in our deeds and how we can bring God’s presence into the world.

Parsha Acharei Mot – אַחֲרֵי מוֹת Torah Summary:

The duties that the head kohein must perform on Yom Kippur are delineated and the ceremony of the scapegoat is outlined. (16:1-28) Moses instructs Aaron about the Yom Kippur laws for fasting and atonement. (16:29-34) Warnings are issued against the offering of sacrifices outside the Sanctuary and the consumption of blood. (17:1-16) Acharei Mot – אַחֲרֵי מוֹת

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