TORAH TIDBIT

Torah Tidbits - Study Judaism with Rabbi Rapport and Rabbi David.
Torah Tidbits - Study Judaism with Rabbi Rapport and Rabbi David. Ki Tisa Tetzaveh Pekudei Vayikra (Leviticus 1:1−5:26)The opening word of Leviticus that gives the book and this first parashah its name is Vayikra Tazria Metzorah Achrei Mot Emor B’har B’hukotai Sh’lach L’cha Korach Matot Masei D'varim Va-et’chanan Eikev Nitzavim Chayei Sarah Tol'dot

Yom Rishon shel Rosh Hashanah (Genesis 22:1-19)

This Week’s Torah Portion: Yom Rishon shel Rosh Hashanah – יוֹם רִאשׁוֹן שֶׁל רֹאשׁ הַשָּׁנָה (Genesis 22:1-19)

Every year, we take part in ritualized ceremonies that are intended to help us repent and become better and more worthy people. The essence of the High Holy Days is the chance we are given each year to engage in spiritual stock-taking, to repair ourselves, and to enjoy a new opportunity in our relations with God and our fellow humans. It is hard to imagine a more optimistic day than one that offers us a chance, every year, to turn over a new leaf in our lives.

Parsha Yom Rishon shel Rosh Hashanah Summary:

Rosh Hashanah Morning, Day 1 (Genesis 21)(Many Reform congregations omit this portion, and read Genesis 22 on Rosh Hashanah, Day 1.)Sarah, who has longed for a child for many years, conceives a child with Abraham and gives birth to Isaac, meaning “one who laughs.” Isaac’s birth fulfills Gods promise that they will bear a son who will grow to be a generation. As Isaac grows into his boyhood, Sarah is conflicted by the presence of her servant Hagar and her son Ishmael that she conceived with Abraham and Hagar is banished from the home. God visits Hagar in the wilderness her, promises that Ishmael will also grow into a great nation, and tenderly provides water for the mother and son. Ishmael grows to adulthood and is married. This portion is a reminder that God’s promises are kept, and God’s compassion extends beyond the tents of our people.Rosh Hashanah Morning, Day 2 (Genesis 22)(Many Reform congregations read this portion on Rosh Hashanah, Day 1.)This portion is commonly known as The Akeidah, or “the binding.” In these terse and tense verses, the subject matter touches upon God, the nature of faith, and the demands faith may make of us. God calls upon Abraham to sacrifice his son Isaac as a supreme test of faith. Abraham, God’s loyal servant, agrees. Just as Abraham is about to offer his son up as a sacrifice, an angel calls out to him, instructing him not to harm the boy, and Abraham sacrifices a ram in place of his son. For the ancient reader this may have served as a rejection of human sacrifice, a practice of ancient Israel’s neighbors. For the modern reader, perhaps one is called upon to consider one’s own tests and sacrifices.The haftarah (1 Samuel 1:1-2:10)Tells the story how Hannah prayed to God for a child, and how her prayer was answered with subsequent birth of Samuel.
Torah Tidbits - Study Judaism with Rabbi Rapport and Rabbi David. Ki Tisa Tetzaveh Pekudei Vayikra (Leviticus 1:1−5:26)The opening word of Leviticus that gives the book and this first parashah its name is Vayikra Tazria Metzorah Achrei Mot Emor B’har B’hukotai Sh’lach L’cha Korach Matot Masei D'varim Va-et’chanan Eikev Nitzavim Chayei Sarah Tol'dot

Nitzavim – Vayeilech (Deuteronomy 29:9–30:20, 31:1–30)

This Week’s Torah Portion: Nitzavim – Vayeilech- נִצָּבִים – וַיֵּלֶךְ (Deuteronomy 29:9–30:20, 31:1–30)

“Then Adonai your God will restore your fortunes and have compassion on you” (Deuteronomy 30:3).

Adonai our God evolves through history and our relationship with God continues to develop.

As we approach the end of the Torah and the end of the book of Deuteronomy, we find a new concept in the Torah, repentance. We can return to God, we can mend our ways, we can repent and God is now a compassionate God.

Parsha Nitzavim – Vayeilech Summary:

Moses tells the assembled people that God’s covenant speaks to them and to all of the generations who will follow. (29:9–14) God warns the Israelites that they will be punished if they act idolatrously, the way the inhabitants of the other nations do. (29:15–28) Moses reassures the people that God will not forsake them and that they can attain blessings by following God’s commandments. (30:1–20) Moses prepares the people for his death and announces that Joshua will succeed him. (31:1–8) Moses instructs the priests and the elders regarding the importance of reading the Torah. (31:9–13) God informs Moses that upon his death, the people will commit idolatry and “many evils and troubles shall befall them.” God tells Moses to teach the people a poem that will “be My witness.” (31:14–30)

“Then Adonai your God will restore your fortunes and have compassion on you” (Deuteronomy 30:3).

Adonai our God evolves through history and our relationship with God continues to develop.

As we approach the end of the Torah and the end of the book of Deuteronomy, we find a new concept in the Torah, repentance. We can return to God, we can mend our ways, we can repent and God is now a compassionate God.

Torah Tidbits - Study Judaism with Rabbi Rapport and Rabbi David. Ki Tisa Tetzaveh Pekudei Vayikra (Leviticus 1:1−5:26)The opening word of Leviticus that gives the book and this first parashah its name is Vayikra Tazria Metzorah Achrei Mot Emor B’har B’hukotai Sh’lach L’cha Korach Matot Masei D'varim Va-et’chanan Eikev Nitzavim Chayei Sarah Tol'dot

Ki Tavo (Deuteronomy 26:1–29:8)

This Week’s Torah Portion: Ki Tavo – כִּי-תָבוֹא (Deuteronomy 26:1–29:8)

“You have declared this day that Adonai is your God … And Adonai has declared this day that you are God’s people …” (Deuteronomy 26:17-18)

We choose God and God chose us. It is a mutual relationship we have with God. As the rabbis interpret in the Talmud.  The people of Israel crown Adonai every day when we say at our Temples and synagogues, “Hear Israel Adonai is your God, Adonai One”

Parsha Ki Tavo Summary:

The Israelites are instructed to express their gratitude to God for their bountiful harvests and freedom from slavery by tithing ten percent of their crops for the Levite, the stranger, the orphan, and the widow. (26) The people are told to display on large stones God’s commandments for all to see. (27:1-8) The Levites are to proclaim curses upon those who violate God’s commandments. (27:15-26) The Israelites are told that if they obey God’s mitzvot faithfully, they will receive every blessing imaginable. They are also told that if do not fulfill their brit with God, many curses will descend upon them. (28:1-69) Moses reminds the Israelites of the miracles they witnessed in the wilderness and commands them to observe the terms of the covenant so that they may succeed in all that they undertake. (29:1-8)
Torah Tidbits - Study Judaism with Rabbi Rapport and Rabbi David. Ki Tisa Tetzaveh Pekudei Vayikra (Leviticus 1:1−5:26)The opening word of Leviticus that gives the book and this first parashah its name is Vayikra Tazria Metzorah Achrei Mot Emor B’har B’hukotai Sh’lach L’cha Korach Matot Masei D'varim Va-et’chanan Eikev Nitzavim Chayei Sarah Tol'dot

Ki Teitzei (Deuteronomy 21:10–25:19)

This Week’s Torah Portion: Ki Teitzei- כִּי-תֵצֵא (Deuteronomy 16:18-21:9)

“A woman must not wear men’s clothing, nor a man wear women’s clothing, for Adonai your God detests anyone who does this.” (Deuteronomy 22:3)

Our ancestors were obsessed with organizing the world, everything needed to be in order that is why we cannot plow our fields using two kinds of animals, nor wear clothes that are a mixture of cotton and wool, or plant hybrid trees or vegetables.

They did not realize that what makes the world more interesting, what brings out life, is when we go out of the ordinary when we allow a man to wear a woman’s dress (just like Jacob did for Joseph) or vis- a verse. And the best fruits, cloths and vegetables and also humans are the hybrid ones who do not follow the roles and mix one species with the other.

Parsha Ki Teitzei Summary:

Moses reviews a wide variety of laws regarding family, animals, and property. (21:10–22:12) Various civil and criminal laws are delineated, including those regarding sexual relationships, interaction with non-Israelites, loans, vows, and divorce. (22:13–24:5) Laws of commerce pertaining to loans, fair wages, and proper weights and measures are given. (24:10–25:16) The parashah concludes with the commandment to remember for all time the most heinous act committed against the Israelites—Amalek’s killing of the old, weak, and infirm after the Israelites left Egypt. (25:17–19)

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