TORAH TIDBIT

Torah Tidbits - Study Judaism with Rabbi Rapport and Rabbi David.
Torah Tidbits - Study Judaism with Rabbi Rapport and Rabbi David. Ki Tisa Tetzaveh Pekudei Vayikra (Leviticus 1:1−5:26)The opening word of Leviticus that gives the book and this first parashah its name is Vayikra Tazria Metzorah Achrei Mot Emor B’har B’hukotai Sh’lach L’cha Korach Matot Masei D'varim Va-et’chanan Eikev Nitzavim Chayei Sarah Tol'dot Mishpatim

Ki Tisa (Exodus 30:11−34:35)

This Week’s Torah Portion: Ki Tisa – כִּי תִשָּׂא (Exodus 30:11−34:35)

“I will have mercy on whom I will have mercy, and I will have compassion on whom I will have compassion”

Adonai reveals to Moses one of the greats ideals of all times, the idea of Teshuvah (repentance), we give people a second chance.

We can start fresh and a new when ever we want and need too,

Adonai will always be there to forgive us!

Adonai is full of compassion and mercy! That should be a model for us, to allow people to have a second chance, to repent, try and be compassionate and show mercy, to those who have wronged us and repented.

Parsha Ki Tisa Torah Summary:

Moses takes a census of the Israelites and collects a half-shekel from each person (30:11-16) God tells Moses to construct a water basin and to prepare anointing oil and incense for the ordination of the priests. Bezalel and Oholiab, skilled artisans, are assigned to make objects for the priests and the Tabernacle. (30:17-31:11) The Israelites are instructed to keep Shabbat as a sign of their covenant with God. God gives Moses the two tablets of the Pact. (31:12-18) The Israelites ask Aaron to build them a Golden Calf. Moses implores God not to destroy the people and then breaks the two tablets of the Pact on which the Ten Commandments are written when he sees the idol. God punishes the Israelites by means of a plague. (32:1-35) Moses goes up the mountain with a blank set of tablets for another 40 days so that God will again inscribe the Ten Commandments. Other laws, including the edict to observe the Pilgrimage Festivals, are also revealed. (34:1-28) Moses comes down from the mountain with a radiant face. (34:29-35)“I will have mercy on whom I will have mercy, and I will have compassion on whom I will have compassion” Adonai reveals to Moses one of the greats ideals of all times, the idea of Teshuvah (repentance), we give people a second chance. We can start fresh and a new when ever we want and need too, Adonai will always be there to forgive us! Adonai is full of compassion and mercy! That should be a model for us, to allow people to have a second chance, to repent, try and be compassionate and show mercy, to those who have wronged us and repented.
Torah Tidbits - Study Judaism with Rabbi Rapport and Rabbi David. Ki Tisa Tetzaveh Pekudei Vayikra (Leviticus 1:1−5:26)The opening word of Leviticus that gives the book and this first parashah its name is Vayikra Tazria Metzorah Achrei Mot Emor B’har B’hukotai Sh’lach L’cha Korach Matot Masei D'varim Va-et’chanan Eikev Nitzavim Chayei Sarah Tol'dot Mishpatim

T’tzaveh (Exodus 27:20−30:10) – Shabbat Purim

This Week’s Torah Portion: T’tzaveh – תְּצַוֶּה Exodus 27:20−30:10) – Shabbat Purim

Purim story seems simple, there is a king, stupid and drunk, a beautiful queen, Esther,  her wise uncle, Mordechai the Jew, and a wicked man who wants to kill all Jews (Haman). We win, and now let’s go drink (Alcohol) and eat Hamantaschen (literally Haman’s hat).

Purim has one great lesson in it! What we do matters. No miracles are mentioned in the story, God does not appear even once in the story. It is all up to how we behave, kind of what is happening in real life, actions matter.

Parsha T’tzaveh Torah Summary:

The children of Israel are commanded to bring pure olive oil for the ner tamid “a constantly burning light,” above the sanctuary. (27:20-21) Aaron and his sons, Nadab, Abihu, Eleazar, and Ithamar, are chosen to serve as priests. (28:1) God instructs Moses to make special clothes for the priests. (28:2-43) Aaron and his sons are ordained in a seven-day ceremony (29:1-29:46) Aaron is commanded to burn incense on an acacia altar every morning and evening. (30:1-10)This Week’s Torah Portion: T’tzaveh – תְּצַוֶּה (Exodus 27:20−30:10) Purim story seems simple, there is a king, stupid and drunk, a beautiful queen, Esther, her wise uncle, Mordechai the Jew, and a wicked man who wants to kill all Jews (Haman). We win, and now let’s go drink (Alcohol) and eat Hamantaschen (literally Haman’s hat). Purim has one great lesson in it! What we do matters. No miracles are mentioned in the story, God does not appear even once in the story. It is all up to how we behave, kind of what is happening in real life, actions matter.
Torah Tidbits - Study Judaism with Rabbi Rapport and Rabbi David. Ki Tisa Tetzaveh Pekudei Vayikra (Leviticus 1:1−5:26)The opening word of Leviticus that gives the book and this first parashah its name is Vayikra Tazria Metzorah Achrei Mot Emor B’har B’hukotai Sh’lach L’cha Korach Matot Masei D'varim Va-et’chanan Eikev Nitzavim Chayei Sarah Tol'dot Mishpatim

T’rumah (Exodus 25:1−27:19)

This Week’s Torah Portion: T’rumah – תְּרוּמָה Exodus 25:1−27:19)

“…make a Temple for me, and I will dwell among them”

The great endeavor of having God dwell among us begins as we are building a Temple for God.

That has worked with the ebbs and flow for our people for thousands of years. The synagogues and the temples always being the centers of Jewish live and tradition and community.

Is that still the case?

What can we do to make it better?

Feel free to write me your thoughts, [email protected].

Parsha T’rumah Torah Summary:

God asks the Children of Israel to donate gifts (t’rumah) for the building of the Tabernacle so that God may “dwell among them.” (25:1-9) Instructions for the construction of the Ark, table, and menorah are provided. (25:10-40) Detailed directions are given on how to build the Tabernacle. (26:1-27:19)T’rumah (Exodus 13:17−17:16)“…make a Temple for me, and I will dwell among them” The great endeavor of having God dwell among us begins as we are building a Temple for God. That has worked with the ebbs and flow for our people for thousands of years. The synagogues and the temples always being the centers of Jewish live and tradition and community. Is that still the case? What can we do to make it better? Feel free to write me your thoughts, [email protected]
Torah Tidbits - Study Judaism with Rabbi Rapport and Rabbi David. Ki Tisa Tetzaveh Pekudei Vayikra (Leviticus 1:1−5:26)The opening word of Leviticus that gives the book and this first parashah its name is Vayikra Tazria Metzorah Achrei Mot Emor B’har B’hukotai Sh’lach L’cha Korach Matot Masei D'varim Va-et’chanan Eikev Nitzavim Chayei Sarah Tol'dot Mishpatim

Mishpatim (Exodus 21:1−24:18)

This Week’s Torah Portion: Mishpatim – מִשְׁפָּטִים Exodus 21:1−24:18)

The only place in the Torah where abortion is mentioned is here, in this week’s Torah portion.

Our Torah portion makes a clear point that an embryo is not considered life. Jewish law builds on this saying that only when the child emerges out it is considered a life.

Jewish law says that if there is a risk to the woman’s health, life (later rabbis add also socio – economic situation) then an abortion should be the woman’s option.

Will be speaking about this issue this Shabbat during Repro Shabbat service at The Temple.

Parsha Mishpatim Torah Summary:

Interpersonal laws ranging from the treatment of slaves to the exhibition of kindness to strangers are listed. (21:1-23:9) Cultic laws follow, including the commandment to observe the Sabbatical Year, a repetition of the Sabbath injunction, the first mention of the Three Pilgrimage Festivals, rules of sacrificial offerings, and the prohibition against boiling a kid in its mother’s milk. (23:10-19) The people assent to the covenant. Moses, Aaron, Nadab, Abihu, and seventy elders of Israel ascend the mountain and see God. Moses goes on alone and spends forty days on the mountain. (24:1-18) The only place in the Torah where abortion is mentioned is here, in this week’s Torah portion, Mishpatim. Our Torah portion makes a clear point that an embryo is not considered life. Jewish law builds on this saying that only when the child emerges out it is considered a life. Jewish law says that if there is a risk to the woman’s health, life (later rabbis add also socio – economic situation) then an abortion should be the woman’s option. Will be speaking about this issue this shabbat during Repro Shabbat service at The Temple.

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